vendredi 10 mars 2017

If Neanderthals were Carnivores, were they Post-Flood?


As I mentioned, I have a problem integrating Göbekli Tepe archaeology into the timeline, since I don't yet know the uncalibrated carbon dates for GT. While waiting for a response (it could be there when I take a look in the mail), I'm dealing with another question.

I just encountered this, yesterday:

No. After Noah’s Flood around 2500 BC, Yahweh explicitly gave man permission to eat meat.

The fear of you and the terror of you will be on every beast of the earth and on every bird of the sky; with everything that creeps on the ground, and all the fish of the sea, into your hand they are given. Every moving thing that is alive shall be food for you; I give all to you, as I gave the green plant. (Genesis 9:2-3 KJV)

Yahweh gave meat, birds, and fish to man to eat, just as He had originally given green plants.

So the first human carnivores were Noah’s family.


Did Adam Like Steak?
(4 Minute Read)| Posted by: BibleScienceGuy | August 3, 2016
https://biblescienceguy.wordpress.com/2016/08/03/did-adam-like-steak/


The first actual carnivores?

Or the first carnivores with God's blessing?

One can also imagine that carnivorousness was generally not done, but exceptionally done when an animal was sacrificed, up to Flood.

But generally speaking carnivorousness was not God's plan for man before the Flood.

Can it have happened anyway?

It seems some Neanderthal bones have been found with marks suggesting cannibalism. That certainly suggests something like "all the thought of their heart was bent upon evil at all times," "And the earth was corrupted before God, and was filled with iniquity," and "for all flesh had corrupted its way upon the earth". In other words, meat eating can have been done as defiance of God's original plan, along with cannibalism.

Also, not all Neanderthals were meateaters:

Caveman menu: Woolly rhino in Belgium, mushrooms in Spain video
SETH BORENSTEIN
Last updated 15:31, March 9 2017
http://www.stuff.co.nz/science/90250357/caveman-menu-woolly-rhino-in-belgium-mushrooms-in-spain


Eating like a caveman meant chowing down on woolly rhinos and sheep in Belgium, but munching on mushrooms, pine nuts and moss in Spain. It all depended on where they lived, new research shows.

Scientists got a sneak peek into the kitchen of three Neanderthals by scraping off the plaque stuck on their teeth and examining the DNA. What they found smashes a common public misconception that the caveman diet was mostly meat. They also found hints that one sickly teen used primitive versions of penicillin and aspirin to help ease his pain.


So, supposing that Neanderthals lived pre-Flood, those who lived in Spain were living more like God had wanted it than those living in Belgium.

Of course, if they lived as excluded from most of Nodian society and if that meant hardships, it is quite possible God did not consider their meat eating sinful, unlike of course cannibalism.

As to "primitive versions of penicillin", that would mean bread mold. One way of getting it in well tasting package is of course blue cheese - if you like these, as I do. And yes, I tested it while not being able to buy penicillin or other antibiotic, it works.

The primitive version of aspirin would probably be bark from willow bracnhes.

And, if you did not live as far North as Belgium, as said, you might even be a Neanderthal vegetarian. Meaning, within the framework God set for normal behaviour before the Flood.

While Genesis 9:3 certainly means it is not of itself sinful to eat meat, we do well to revive pre-Flood conditions once in a while, on that account.

The rule among Pharisees seems to have been Mondays and Thursdays or perhaps Tuesdays and Thursdays every week, among Christians it was cnaged even very early on to Wednesday and Friday every week, and when later on dispensations for Easter tide came, it was made up for by so to speak "collecting" some of this vegetarianism to weekdays in Lent, fridays and saturdays in Advent. And fridays outside Easter tide and Christmas octave.

Hans Georg Lundahl
Nanterre UL
Ember Friday
of Lent
10.III.2017

See also: Cannibal Belgian Neanderthals made tools from human bones
Last updated 15:05, July 7 2016
http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/europe/81868371/Cannibal-Belgian-Neanderthals-made-tools-from-human-bones

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